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Labradorite Crown Ring History and Craftsmanship

Handmade Labradorite Sterling Silver Crown Ring

Brian and I work hard to ensure our labradorite’s intense colors dance with fire. We think there is nothing sadder than a beautiful piece of jewelry with a dead labradorite in it. Brian selectively sources each rough stone through various dealers and then cuts them to size for my rings in his lapidary workshop.

The stone offers a wide range of color–mixed greens and blues are most common, but you can also find red, orange, and yellow. Purple labradorite is quite rare, but sometimes you’ll see threads of the royal shade mixed with the other colors. Because of the variety in shades and patterns, each ring will be unique as its wearer. Rest assured: all of them will be beautiful.

In medieval times, jewelry was as symbolic as it was decorative. Accessories could signify both your rank within an organization, such as the military or church, and the types of stone or metal were often tightly controlled by sumptuary laws. These laws were designed to reinforce strict social classes–everything from food to clothing could be regulated, depending where you lived. Only the upper classes were permitted to wear fine jewelry and clothes, which meant many jewelers could not legally wear their own creations!

Symbols connected with royalty, such as the crown-inspired setting in these rings, were restricted to those of royal blood and people with a high rank in Court. One theory surrounding medieval portraits suggests that people held (rather than wore) certain pieces of fine jewelry because they weren’t allowed to wear the pieces, unless they were gifted to them by royalty.

This sterling silver ring is a special piece–labradorite is my favorite stone and I craft each ring by hand, carefully tracing the outline of each stone to make the crown-inspired setting just right. This fairly modern addition to jewelry was first discovered in Labrador, Canada, in the late 1700s, but wasn’t used as a gem until spectrolite, a labradorite variety, was found in Finland after World War II.

The stone has been well known to the Inuit, who believe the flashes of color and fire are the Northern Lights shining within the stone. Legend tells us a passing warrior saw the lights trapped within the stone and freed them with a mighty strike from his spear, releasing the wonder into the night sky. Some of the lights remained within, and that’s how we came to have this magical piece of nature.

Handmade Labradorite Rings In-progress

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